Cold Weather Cycling Tips

COLD WEATHER CYCLING TIPS

Cold winter weather is finally here!! If you've been taking some time off or haven't had to endure cold-weather Riding in awhile, you may not be fully prepared for the frigid onslaught.

Base layer Base Layer

First, consider the rule of layering. This is a technique of wearing varying weights of clothing designed to absorb, trap, hold and block. The overall purpose of layering is to trap insulating air between layers of clothing and subsequently hold heat in.

Rechargeable Lights Be Safe and Be Seen

Bring a light. Dusk falls early on grey winter days. Do yourself and the cars around you a favour- deck yourself out with lights and reflective clothing. A red flashy light on your chain stay and a white light on your handlebars will help you see and be seen.

Leg warmer Cover Up

Another rule of thumb is to keep knees covered anytime the weather is below 10°c. Cycling leg warmers are also convenient as they are easy to zip on and off quickly as needed. For colder weather, full cycling tights range from lightweight to heavy and waterproof, or you can find insulated pants.

Accessories Accessories

If you're determined to cycle through the winter whatever the weather, an easy way to make it more pleasant is by fitting your bicycle with mudguards. For commuting, mudguards are a no-brainer. If you want to cycle to work through the winter, mudguards go a long way to ensuring you stay reasonably dry.

Head protection The Head

About 30 percent of the body's heat is lost through the head. A tremendous supply of blood circulates through this area, so if you keep your head warm, your body will stay warm. Depending on the severity of cold, differing levels of head equipment can be used.

Winter Tyre Wider is better for Winter Tyres

Wide winter tyres also offer advantages typically on wintry road surfaces. On compacted snow surfaces in particular, they offer more space to form thick edges, fill deeper tyre tread grooves with snow and increase friction between the rubber and snow.

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